Disaster healthcare system management and crisis intervention leadership in thailand-lessons learned from the 2004 tsunami disaster

Rami Peltz, Issac Ashkenazi, Dagan Schwartz, Ofer Shushan, Guy Nakash, Adi Leiba, Yeheskel Levi, Avishay Goldberg, Yaron Bar-Dayan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: Quarantelli established criteria for evaluating the effectiveness of disaster management.Objectives: The objectives of this study were to analyze the response of the healthcare system to the Tsunami disaster according to the Quarantelli principles, and to validate these principles in a scenario of a disaster due to natural hazards.Methods: The Israeli Defense Forces (IDF) Home Front Command Medical Department sent a research team to study the response of the Thai medical system to the disaster. The analysis of the disaster management was based on Quarantelli's 10 criteria for evaluating the management of community disasters. Data were collected through personal and group interviews.Results: The three most important elements for effective disaster management were: (1) the flow of information; (2) overall coordination; and (3) leadership. Although pre-event preparedness was for different and smaller scenarios, medical teams repeatedly reported a better performance in hospitals that recently conducted drills.Conclusions: In order to increase effectiveness, disaster management response should focus on: (1) the flow of information; (2) overall coordination; and (3) leadership.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)299-302
Number of pages4
JournalPrehospital and Disaster Medicine
Volume21
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2006

Keywords

  • Israeli Defense Forces
  • Thailand
  • coordination
  • disaster management
  • hospitals
  • information
  • leadership
  • natural hazards
  • preparedness
  • tsunami

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