Distribution of human herpesvirus-8 latently infected cells in Kaposi's sarcoma, multicentric Castleman's disease, and primary effusion lymphoma

Nicolas Dupin, Cyril Fisher, Paul Kellam, Sam Ariad, Micheline Tulliez, Nathalie Franck, Eric Van Marck, Dominique Salmon, Isabelle Gorin, Jean Paul Escande, Robin A. Weiss, Kari Alitalo, Chris Boshoff

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607 Scopus citations

Abstract

Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8, also called KSHV) is linked to the etiopathogenesis of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD), and primary effusion lymphoma (PEL). The universal presence of HHV-8 in early KS has not yet been shown. We used a mAb (LN53) against latent nuclear antigen-1 (LNA-1) of HHV-8 encoded by ORF73 to study the distribution of the cell types latently infected by HHV-8 in patch, plaque, and nodular KS, MCD, and PEL. In early KS, HHV-8 is present in <10% of cells forming the walls of ectatic vessels. In nodular KS, HHV-8 is present in cells surrounding slit-like vessels and in >90% of spindle cells, but not in normal vascular endothelium. In addition, HHV-8 colocalizes with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 (VEGFR-3), a marker of lymphatic and precursor endothelium. In early KS lesions, VEGFR-3 is more extensively expressed than LNA-1, indicating that HHV-8 is not inducing the proliferation of VEGFR-3-positive endothelium directly. In MCD, HHV-8 is present in mantle zone large immunoblastic B cells. No staining for LNA-1 is seen in samples from multiple myeloma, prostate cancer, and angiosarcoma, supporting the absence of any etiological link between these diseases and HHV-8.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4546-4551
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume96
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 13 Apr 1999

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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