Does elastic rebound theory apply to seismic faults?

A. Ziv, A. Cochard, J. Schmittbuh

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

We examine the evolution of and the exchange between two forms of elastic energies stored in the quasidynamic fault model of Ziv and Cochard [1]. The first, Etect, is due to the integrated slip deficit accumulated between the plate boundaries and the fault surface, and the second, E fault, is the elastic energy stored as a result of differential slip along the fault surface. Time series of these energies show that large earthquakes occur during the descending portions of the Etect-curve, and close to the maxima of the Efault-curve. Interestingly, these results are not in agreement with the classical view of the elastic rebound theory (Reid, [2]). While the elastic rebound theory predicts that large earthquakes occur at the maxima of the Etect-curve, in our model they occur at the maxima of the Efault-curve. The latter, arising from the slip heterogeneity along the fault, is not at all accounted for in the elastic rebound theory, on which present earthquake prediction models rely.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication11th International Conference on Fracture 2005, ICF11
Pages5718-5721
Number of pages4
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2005
Event11th International Conference on Fracture 2005, ICF11 - Turin, Italy
Duration: 20 Mar 200525 Mar 2005

Publication series

Name11th International Conference on Fracture 2005, ICF11
Volume8

Conference

Conference11th International Conference on Fracture 2005, ICF11
Country/TerritoryItaly
CityTurin
Period20/03/0525/03/05

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