Drinking desalinated water that lack calcium and magnesium has no effect on mineral content of enamel and dentin in primary teeth

Avia Fux Noy, Uri Zilberman, Noa Regev, Moti Moskovitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: The present study compared the mineral contents of enamel and dentin of primary teeth from children exposed to desalinated water with those from children drinking ground water. Study design: The study comprised of two groups of teeth, seven primary teeth from children living in areas supplied exclusively with desalinated water and seven primary teeth from children that have been exposed solely to ground water from in-utero until the teeth were either extracted or naturally shed. Mineral content of three tooth regions was determined by scanning electron microscopy with an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS). The main ion content of each region was calculated. Results: Children exposed to ground water presented higher levels of magnesium in pre- and post- natal enamel than children living in areas supplied exclusively with desalinated water but without significant differences. The same was found for calcium levels. Excluding post-natal enamel calcium level (of borderline statistical significance), no significant differences were found in magnesium and calcium levels of primary teeth enamel and dentin of children exposed to desalinated water in comparison to children exposed to ground water. Conclusion: Mineral content of enamel and dentin in primary teeth is not affected by consuming desalinated water.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)47-51
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
Volume44
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Dentin minerals
  • Desalinated water
  • Enamel minerals
  • Primary teeth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (all)

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