Drone in love: Emotional perception of facial expressions on flying robots

Viviane Herdel, Anastasia Kuzminykh, Andrea Hildebrandt, Jessica R. Cauchard

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Drones are rapidly populating human spaces, yet little is known about how these fying robots are perceived and understood by humans. Recent works suggested that their acceptance is predicated upon their sociability. This paper explores the use of facial expressions to represent emotions on social drones. We leveraged design practices from ground robotics and created a set of rendered robotic faces that convey basic emotions. We evaluated individuals' response to these emotional facial expressions on drones in two empirical studies (N = 98, N = 98). Our results demonstrate that individuals accurately recognize fve drone emotional expressions, as well as make sense of intensities within emotion categories. We describe how participants were emotionally afected by the drone, showed empathy towards it, and created narratives to interpret its emotions. As a consequence, we formulate design recommendations for social drones and discuss methodological insights on the use of static versus dynamic stimuli in afective robotics studies.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCHI 2021 - Proceedings of the 2021 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings
Subtitle of host publicationMaking Waves, Combining Strengths
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery
ISBN (Electronic)9781450380966
DOIs
StatePublished - 6 May 2021
Event2021 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems: Making Waves, Combining Strengths, CHI 2021 - Virtual, Online, Japan
Duration: 8 May 202113 May 2021

Conference

Conference2021 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems: Making Waves, Combining Strengths, CHI 2021
Country/TerritoryJapan
CityVirtual, Online
Period8/05/2113/05/21

Keywords

  • Afective computing
  • Anthropomorphism
  • Emotion recognition
  • Facial expressions
  • Human-drone interaction
  • Robot
  • Uav

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design
  • Software

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