Effect of AMF application on growth, productivity and susceptibility to Verticillium wilt of olives grown under desert conditions

Yoram Kapulnik, Leah Tsror, Issac Zipori, Marina Hazanovsky, Smadar Wininger, Arnon Dag

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

46 Scopus citations

Abstract

The effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) on olive (Olea europaea) growth and development was followed for 4 years after transplanting in irrigated commercial orchards under arid conditions. Sites I and II were irrigated with saline water (EC∈=∈4.5 dS/m). In site I, the soil was infested with Verticillium dahliae and olive varieties 'Picual' (Verticillium susceptible) and 'Barnea' (relatively Verticillium tolerant) were tested. In site II, the soil was virgin soil (previously non-cultivated soil) and olive varieties 'Souri' and 'Barnea' were tested. Plants for all sites were inoculated in the nursery with Glomus intraradices alone or in a mixture with G. mosseae. Relative to non-inoculated trees, AMF colonization enhanced vegetative growth, expressed as tree height and trunk circumference, at all sites. At first commercial harvest, AMF-treated trees had higher fruit and oil yields than non-mycorrhitic controls. Under saline water irrigation, differences between inoculated and non-inoculated treatments were reduced in the slow-growing 'Souri' but remained apparent in the modern fast-growing 'Barnea'. AMF colonization did not appear to improve tolerance of either 'Picual' or 'Barnea' to V. dahliae, and both were more susceptible than the non-inoculated controls. Thus inoculation of olive plants with AMF improves transplant growth and adaptation in arid areas during the first 3 years of growth and until the first commercial harvesting season.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)103-111
Number of pages9
JournalSymbiosis
Volume52
Issue number2-3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis
  • Olives
  • Verticillium wilt

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Agricultural and Biological Sciences

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