Effect of inertial tail on yaw rate of 45 gram legged robot

N. J. Kohut, D. W. Haldane, D. Zarrouk, R. S. Fearing

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

Small legged robots have unique potential for widespread application in search and rescue, hazardous exploration, battlefield reconnaissance, and almost any remote, inaccessible or dangerous situation not reachable by humans. Dynamic running robots have used a variety of steering means, including differential velocity drive [1][2] and actively changing leg kinematics [3][4]. Previous robots have also used tails for various functions, such as turning in an aquatic environment [5], active pitch control [6][7], or stabilization during climbing [8]. The robot discussed here uses a tail to produce a turn on rough or flat ground. This paper examines the way in which this is done, through the use of angular momentum exchange and internal impacts that generate a turning impulse.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAdaptive Mobile Robotics - Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Climbing and Walking Robots and the Support Technologies for Mobile Machines, CLAWAR 2012
PublisherWorld Scientific Publishing Co. Pte Ltd
Pages157-164
Number of pages8
ISBN (Print)9789814415941
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2012
Externally publishedYes
Event15th International Conference on Climbing and Walking Robots and the Support Technologies for Mobile Machines, CLAWAR 2012 - Baltimore, MD, United States
Duration: 23 Jul 201226 Jul 2012

Publication series

NameAdaptive Mobile Robotics - Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Climbing and Walking Robots and the Support Technologies for Mobile Machines, CLAWAR 2012

Conference

Conference15th International Conference on Climbing and Walking Robots and the Support Technologies for Mobile Machines, CLAWAR 2012
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityBaltimore, MD
Period23/07/1226/07/12

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