Effect Of Ligation Of Spleen Vessels On Left Ventricular Function And Coronary Blood Flow In Dogs Injected With Scorpion Venom

Ariel Tarasiuk, Lior Sasson, Shaul Sofer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Scorpion sting may cause myocardial dysfunction in human victims, probably by increased O2demand and decreased O2supply. In dog, scorpion venom (SV) causes no myocardial dysfunction. Myocardium is probably protected by “autotransfusion” of blood from the spleen to the circulation, increasing coronary blood flow (CBF) and O2delivery. We hypothesized that ligation of spleen vessels prior to injection of SV in dogs would prevent the autotransfusion of blood, thereby causing myocardial ischemia due to decreased CBF, simulating the hemodynamic pattern of human envenomation. We studied cardiac output (CO), CBF, left ventricular (LV) O2delivery and contractility in 11 dogs injected with 0.07 mg/kg of SV (Leiurus quinquestriatus). Ligation of spleen vessels was performed on 6 of the 11 dogs prior to SV injection. 15 min after SV injection CO had increased by 186% in control dogs, while ligation of spleen vessels completely prevented CO elevation (p<0.001). In both groups, however, LV dp/dt increased by 400% and dp/dt/p by 170% (p<0.001).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)127-142
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Basic and Clinical Physiology and Pharmacology
Volume11
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2000

Keywords

  • cardiac output
  • circulatory failure
  • coronary flow
  • left ventricle
  • oxygen supply and consumption
  • scorpion venom

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