Effects of acetylsalicylic acid treatment on thyroid hormones, prolactins, and the stress response of tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus)

Rogier D. Van Anholt, Tom Spanings, William Koven, Sjoerd E. Wendelaar Bonga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

41 Scopus citations

Abstract

The cyclooxygenase (COX) pathway converts arachidonic acid (ArA) into prostaglandins (PGs), which interact with the stress response in mammals and possibly in fish as well. Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) is a COX inhibitor and was used to characterize the effects of PGs on the release of several hormones and the stress response of tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus). Plasma PGE 2 was significantly reduced at 100 mg ASA/kg body wt, and both basal PGE2 and cortisol levels correlated negatively with plasma salicylate. Basal plasma 3,5,3′-triiodothyronine (T3) was reduced by ASA treatment, whereas prolactin (PRL)188 increased at 100 mg ASA/kg body wt. ASA depressed the cortisol response to the mild stress of 5 min of net confinement. As expected, glucose and lactate were elevated in the stressed control fish, but the responses were blunted by ASA treatment. Gill Na+-K+-ATPase activity was not affected by ASA. Plasma osmolarity increased after confinement in all treatments, whereas sodium only increased at the high ASA dose. This is the first time ASA has been administered to fish in vivo, and the altered hormone release and the inhibition of the acute stress response indicated the involvement of PGs in these processes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)R1098-R1106
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology
Volume285
Issue number5 54-5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2003
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Arachidonic acid
  • Cortisol
  • Eicosanoids
  • Prostaglandins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

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