Effects of different Kalahari-desert VA mycorrhizal communities on mineral acquisition and depletion from the soil by host plants

Gil Bohrer, Varda Kagan-Zur, Nurit Bejerano, David Ward, Gilad Beck, Eleonora Bonifacio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

Seedlings of Vangueria infausta, an indigenous Kalahari tree, were used as plant symbionts in a pot experiment designed to measure the effect of three local vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungal communities on mineral acquisition and concentrations in host shoots. VAM significantly affected seedlings size. The highest level of VAM mycorrhizae occurred in soil with intermediate P concentration. Two VAM communities had the highest mycorrhizal response in their soils of origin. The presence of VAM caused a significant depletion of P from soils. VAM communities differed in their ability to promote P, Ca and N uptake. A significant interaction between VAM community and soil type - in terms of Ca and N concentration in shoots - indicates a local adaptation of the VAM species.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)193-208
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Arid Environments
Volume55
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Oct 2003

Keywords

  • Ecology
  • Kalahari desert
  • Symbiosis
  • Vangueria infausta
  • Vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza

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