Effects of Perception of Prognosis on Existential Well-Being and Ego-Integrity Among Advanced Cancer Patients

Shirly Alon, yaron sela, Sara Carmel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Based on literature review, advanced stage cancer patients hold over-optimistic perception of their prognosis. This phenomenon is presumed to be an implication of defense and coping mechanisms, aiming to alienate the proximity of death. At such circumstances, existential issues arise and when adaptive, serve as powerful psychological resources against distress and despair. The first purpose of the study was to investigate the influence of advanced stage Israeli cancer patients’ perception of prognosis on their existential well-being. The second purpose of the study was to explore the role of ego-integrity as a mediator within the equation of perception of prognosis and existential well-being. Methods: Two hundred and ten Israeli stage 4 cancer patients completed self-report measures of their perception of prognosis, ego-integrity and aspects of existential well-being: personal meaning, inter-personal meaning, death and dying anxiety, satisfaction with life and will-tolive. Results: Positive correlations were demonstrated between perception of prognosis with personal meaning, interpersonal meaning, total meaning satisfaction with life, will-to-live and egointegrity. In addition, negative correlations were demonstrated between perception of prognosis with death-anxiety and dying-anxiety. Perception of prognosis was found to be a predictor of existential well-being, so that the better the perception of prognosis the higher were satisfaction with life (β=0.39, p
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)S59-S67
JournalPalliative Medicine and Hospice Care Open Journal
VolumeSpecial Edition “Palliative Care and Oncology: Time for Increased Collaboration and Integration”
DOIs
StatePublished - 21 Jun 2017

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