Effects of raised lane markers on the accident involvement of older and alcohol-impaired drivers

David Shinar, James C. Fell

Research output: Contribution to journalConference articlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Raised lane markers have been installed in several segments of roadways in the U.S. in order to improve the conspicuity of roadway delineation, and provide drivers with additional non-visual feedback when crossing lanes. These improvements may be most beneficial to visually impaired drivers: older drivers and alcohol intoxicated drivers. To assess these effects, a special study was conducted using the national Fatal Accident Reporting System (FARS). The relative proportions of alcohol intoxicated and older drivers involved in fatal crashes on roadways with raised lane markers was compared to the proportion of alcohol impaired and older drivers involved in fatal crashes on roadways without the raised markers. The role of visual conspicuity was assessed by contrasting the effects of nighttime vs. daytime, and wet vs. dry roads. Despite the extensive data base, no effects of raised lane markers were found on the probabilities of involvement in fatal crashes of either alcohol intoxicated or elderly drivers. These results do not preclude benefits of raised markers for less severe accidents.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1010-1014
Number of pages5
JournalProceedings of the Human Factors Society
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 1990
EventProceedings of the Human Factors Society 34th Annual Meeting - Orlando '90 - Orlando, FL, USA
Duration: 8 Oct 199012 Oct 1990

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