Endocrine effects of valproate versus carbamazepine in males with epilepsy: A prospective study

Hadassa Goldberg-Stern, Tomer Itzhaki, Zohar Landau, Liat De Vries

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background/Aims: To prospectively evaluate the long-term impact of valproate (VPA) versus carbamazepine (CBZ) on anthropometric, hormonal, and metabolic parameters in young male patients treated for epilepsy. Methods: Of 61 boys with newly diagnosed epilepsy followed up, 24 were excluded from analysis (17 were lost to follow-up and 7 changed therapy within <1 year). Findings were compared by time, treatment (VPA or CBZ), and epilepsy type (generalized or partial) as well as against a matched control group with adequately treated hypothyroidism. Results: Twenty-four boys were treated with VPA and 13 with CBZ. The weight-standard deviation score (SDS) significantly increased during the first 6 months of treatment (p < 0.001), irrespective of the drug type, but decreased between the first and the last visit (p = 0.01). In patients with generalized epilepsy, there was a slight decrease in height-and weight-SDS between the first and the last visit (p = 0.04 and p = 0.01, respectively). The height-SDS at the last visit was comparable to the parental height-SDS. The mean age at puberty onset was 11.2 and 11.4 years in the study and the control group, respectively (p = 0.08). There were no significant differences in the other parameters by treatment or epilepsy type. Conclusions: Long-term therapy with VPA or CBZ has no significant endocrinological or metabolic adverse effect on male children and adolescents with epilepsy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)332-339
Number of pages8
JournalHormone Research in Paediatrics
Volume83
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 9 Jun 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Carbamazepine
  • Endocrine effects
  • Males
  • Valproic acid

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