Endometrial carcinoma in the south of Israel: Study of 231 cases

Benjamin Piura, Avner Bar-Dayan, Yoram Cohen, Ilana Yanai-Inbar, Marek Glezerman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background and Objectives: Endometrial carcinoma is the commonest female genital tract malignancy in the south of Israel. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical and histologic findings, treatment and outcome of patients with endometrial carcinoma in the south of Israel. Methods: Data from the files of 231 patients with endometrial carcinoma who were managed at the Soroka Medical Center between January 1961 and December 1994 were evaluated. Results: Endometrial carcinoma was more prevalent among Jewish as compared to Arab-Beduin women, and among Ashkenazi as compared to Sephardic Jewish women. The prevailing presenting symptom was postmenopausal bleeding and most patients (68.8%) had Stage I disease. Most patients (209/225, 92.9%) underwent surgery, 131/222 (59%) had radiotherapy and 15/214 (7%) received chemotherapy. The 5-year survival rate was 79.1% overall: 89% for Stage I, 71.7% for Stage II, 21.6% for Stage III and 0% for Stage IV; 89.8% for Grade 1, 70% for Grade 2 and 60.9% for Grade 3; 100% for adenoacanthoma, 82% for endometrioid carcinoma, 65.8% for adenosquamous carcinoma and 51.6% for papillary serous carcinoma. Conclusions: Endometrial carcinomas are characterized by a relatively favorable prognosis with a 5- year survival of about 80%. Surgical stage, histologic differentiation and histologic subtype are sensitive predictors of survival. The mainstay of treatment is surgery with adjuvant pelvic radiotherapy when necessary.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)189-195
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Surgical Oncology
Volume66
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Nov 1997

Keywords

  • Jews
  • Postmenopausal bleeding
  • Radiotherapy
  • Staging
  • Surgery
  • Survival

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