Energy transfer in the light-harvesting complex II of Dunaliella tertiolecta is unusually sensitive to Triton X-100

Assaf Sukenik, Paul G. Falkowski, John Bennett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Triton X-100, a detergent commonly used to solubilize higher plant thylakoid membranes, was found to be deleterious to Dunaliella LHC II. It disrupted the transfer of excitation energy from chlorophyll b to chlorophyll a. Based on analysis of pigments and immunoassays of LHC II apoproteins from sucrose density gradient fractions, Triton X-100 caused aggregation of the complex, but apparently did not remove chlorophyll b from the apoprotein. Following solubilization with Triton X-100 only CPI could be resolved by electrophoresis. In contrast, solubilization of Dunaliella thylakoids with octyl-β-D-glucopyranoside preserved energy transfer from chlorophyll b to chlorophyll a. This detergent also effectively prevented aggregation on sucrose gradients and preserved CPI oligomers, as well as LHCP1 and LHCP3 on non-denaturing gels. Solubilization with Deriphat gave similar results. We propose that room temperature fluorescence excitation and emission spectroscopy be used in conjunction with other biophysical and biochemical probes to establish the effects of detergents on the integrity of light harvesting chlorophyll protein complexes. Methods used here may be applicable to other chlorophytes which prove refractory to protocols developed for higher plants.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)37-44
Number of pages8
JournalPhotosynthesis Research
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jul 1989
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Dunaliella
  • Triton X-100
  • algae
  • chlorophyll
  • fluorescence
  • light-harvesting proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Plant Science
  • Cell Biology

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