Enhanced tolerance of Mentha arvensis against Meloidogyne incognita (Kofoid and White) Chitwood through mutualistic endophytes and PGPRs

Rakesh Pandey, Arun Kumar Mishra, Sudeep Tiwari, H. N. Singh, Alok Kalra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

The use of herbs in pharmaceutical preparation is ever increasing, and the demand for pesticides free material by the concern industries is on the rise. Consequently the need to grow disease-free plants using non-chemical fertilizers and pesticides is the need of the hour. Mentha arvensis cv. kosi is highly infested with Meloidogyne incognita (Kofoid and White) Chitwood, and severe oil yield loss occurs due to this nematode pest. Employing ecofriendly ways of nematode management, the mutualistic endophytes (Trichoderma harzianum strain Thu, Glomus intraradices) and plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (Bacillus megaterium and Pseudomonas fluorescens) were assessed individually and in combination on plant biomass, oil yield of menthol mint (M. arvensis cv. kosi), reproduction potential and population development of root knot nematode, M. incognita under glasshouse conditions. These microbes enhanced the plant biomass and percent oil yield both with and without M. incognita inoculation. Dual application of mutualistic fungal endophytes and Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPRs) may be a wise option for enhancing the oil yield and tolerance of menthol mint against M. incognita infection.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)247-253
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Plant Interactions
Volume6
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Bacillus megaterium
  • Glomus intraradices
  • Meloidogyne incognita
  • Mentha arvensis
  • Pseudomonas fluorescens
  • Trichoderma harzianum
  • management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Plant Science

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