Evaluation of motions and actuation methods for biomechanical energy harvesting

Penglin Niu, Patrick Chapman, Raziel Riemer, Xudong Zhang

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

114 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper addresses energy harvesting from biomechanical motions. Such a technique is useful for powering small portable devices, such as wireless phones, music players, and digital assistants. For very low power devices, biomechanical energy may be enough to provide baseload power. In others, such as cell phones (which typically requires up to 3 W), biomechanical energy would recharge batteries for extended use between line charges, or allow for peak just-in-time power. In this paper, we consider several biomechanical motions for power generation. We evaluate actuation methods, including magnetic, piezoelectric, electrostatic, and electrical polymers for various motions in terms of energy, power, mass, and cost. We also discuss the practical issues associated with each, especially in terms of the power electronics required to connect the biomechanical sources to useful loads.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2004 IEEE 35th Annual Power Electronics Specialists Conference, PESC04
Pages2100-2106
Number of pages7
DOIs
StatePublished - 29 Nov 2004
Externally publishedYes
Event2004 IEEE 35th Annual Power Electronics Specialists Conference, PESC04 - Aachen, Germany
Duration: 20 Jun 200425 Jun 2004

Publication series

NamePESC Record - IEEE Annual Power Electronics Specialists Conference
Volume3
ISSN (Print)0275-9306

Conference

Conference2004 IEEE 35th Annual Power Electronics Specialists Conference, PESC04
Country/TerritoryGermany
CityAachen
Period20/06/0425/06/04

Keywords

  • Biomechanics
  • Electroactive
  • Electrostatic
  • Energy conversion
  • Magnetic
  • Piezoelectric
  • Polymers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Modeling and Simulation
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Energy Engineering and Power Technology
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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