Expanding the use of posthumous assisted reproduction technique: Should the deceased’s parents be allowed to use his sperm?

Efrat Ram-Tiktin, Roy Gilbar, Ronit B. Fruchter, Ido Ben-Ami, Shevach Friedler, Einat Shalom-Paz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

The posthumous retrieval and use of gametes is socially, ethically, and legally controversial. In the countries that do not prohibit the practice, posthumous assisted reproduction is usually permitted only at the request of the surviving spouse and only when the deceased left written consent. This paper presents the recommendations of an ethics committee established by the Israeli Fertility Association. In its discussions, the committee addressed the ethical considerations of posthumous use of sperm—even in the absence of written consent from the deceased—at the request of either the spouse or the deceased’s parents who wish to become the offspring’s parents or grandparents. It is concluded that under certain conditions, a request by the deceased’s parents to posthumously use the deceased’s sperm is justified and should be granted.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)18-25
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Ethics
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Mar 2019
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Posthumous sperm retrieval
  • ethics
  • gamete retrieval
  • postmortem sperm
  • reproduction

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