Experimental characterization of the hygroscopic properties of wood during convective drying using digital holographic interferometry

Manoj Kumar, Chandra Shakher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

45 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this paper, an application of digital holography for the measurement of surface deformations and the strain field to understand the shrinkage behavior of wood during convective drying is presented. Moisture absorption and desorption induce the dimensional changes and deformations in wood that leads to failure of certain components made of wood. The knowledge of the dimensional changes in wood, deformations, strain distribution and their causes are important for the best utilization of wood. For the study, lensless Fourier transform digital holographic interferometry is used to measure moisture- induced deformation, strain distribution, and the coefficient of hygroscopic shrinkage in different samples of wood. The technique is highly sensitive and enables the observation of deformation and strain distribution during the variations of moisture content in the wood. The wet wood sample was exposed to convective drying, which leads to changes in the moisture content and the associated deformations. The deformation/strain in each step of drying process is used to evaluate the coefficient of hygroscopic shrinkage in different wood samples. The experiments were repeated for differently treated woods. The experimental results show that the strain and coefficient of hygroscopic shrinkage can be minimized if the wood is dried in the presence of the proper moisture content.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)960-968
Number of pages9
JournalApplied Optics
Volume55
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 10 Feb 2016
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Engineering (miscellaneous)
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Experimental characterization of the hygroscopic properties of wood during convective drying using digital holographic interferometry'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this