Fibre-optic bacterial biosensors and their application for the analysis of bioavailable Hg and As in soils and sediments from Aznalcollar mining area in Spain

Angela Ivask, Tal Green, Boris Polyak, Amit Mor, Anne Kahru, Marko Virta, Robert Marks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

94 Scopus citations

Abstract

Fibre-optic biosensors for Hg and As were developed by attaching alginate-immobilised recombinant luminescent Hg- and As-sensor bacteria onto optical fibres. The optimised biosensors (consisting of seven layers of fibre-attached bacteria pre-grown till mid-logarithmic growth phase) enabled quantification of environmentally relevant concentrations of the target analytes: 2.6 μg l-1 of Hg(II) and 141 μg l-1 of As(V) or 18 μg l-1 of As(III). The highest viability and sensitivity for target analyte was obtained when fibre tips were stored in CaCl2 solution at -80 °C. Applicability of the fibre-optic biosensors in parallel to the respective non-immobilised sensors was assessed on 10 natural soil and sediment samples from Aznalcollar mining area (Spain). On the average 0.2% of the total Hg and 0.87% of the total As proved bioavailable to fibre-attached bacteria. Interestingly, about 20-fold more Hg and 4-fold more As was available to non-immobilised sensor bacteria indicating the importance of direct cell contact (possible only for non-immobilised cells) for enhanced bioavailability of these metals in solid samples.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1396-1402
Number of pages7
JournalBiosensors and Bioelectronics
Volume22
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 15 Feb 2007
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Arsenic
  • Bioluminescence
  • Fibre-optic biosensor
  • Mercury
  • Pollution
  • Recombinant bioreporter bacteria

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Biophysics
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Electrochemistry

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Fibre-optic bacterial biosensors and their application for the analysis of bioavailable Hg and As in soils and sediments from Aznalcollar mining area in Spain'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this