Fibromyalgia syndrome in men

Dan Buskila, Lily Neumann, Ali Alhoashle, Mahmoud Abu-Shakra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

77 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is uncommon in men and data on its characteristics and severity are limited. The current study was undertaken to determine whether the clinical characteristics and the spectrum of this disorder are similar in men and women. Methods: Forty men with FMS were matched with 40 women by age and educational level. All subjects were asked about the presence and severity (assessed by visual analog scale) of FMS symptoms; a count of 18 tender points was conducted by thumb palpation, and tenderness thresholds were measured by dolorimetry. Psychological status was assessed by the anxiety and depression subscales of the revised Arthritis Impact Measurement Scales. Quality of life was evaluated by two scales, QOL-16 and SF-36, and physical function was measured by the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire. Results: Men with FMS reported more severe symptoms than women, decreased physical function, and lower quality of life. Women had lower tender thresholds than men; however their mean point counts were similar. Conclusion: Although FMS is uncommon in men, its health outcome in our study population was worse than in women. Further studies in larger samples and in diverse ethnocultural populations are needed to confirm this observation. (C) 2000 by W.B. Saunders Company.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)47-51
Number of pages5
JournalSeminars in Arthritis and Rheumatism
Volume30
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2000

Keywords

  • Fibromyalgia
  • Men
  • Women

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