Field thermo acclimation increases the resilience of Posidonia oceanica seedlings to marine heat waves

Patrizia Stipcich, Arianna Pansini, Pedro Beca-Carretero, Dagmar B. Stengel, Giulia Ceccherelli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Acclimation is a response that results from chronic exposure of an individual to a new environment. This study aimed to investigate whether the thermal environment affects the early development of the seagrass Posidonia oceanica, and whether the effects of a field-simulated Marine Heat Wave (MHW) on seedlings change depending on acclimation. The experiment was done in the field using a crossed design of Acclimation (acclimated vs unacclimated) and MHW (present vs absent) factors. Acclimation has initially constrained the development of P. oceanica seedlings, but then it increased their resilience to the MHW, under both a morphological and biochemical (fatty acid saturation) level. This treatment could be considered in P. oceanica restoration projects in a climate change-impaired sea, by purposely inducing an increased resistance to heat before transplants.

Original languageEnglish
Article number114230
JournalMarine Pollution Bulletin
Volume184
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Nov 2022
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Acclimation
  • Climate change
  • Fatty acids
  • Heat stress
  • Morphological variables
  • Seagrass

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oceanography
  • Aquatic Science
  • Pollution

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