Flow and transport predictions during multi-borehole tests in fractured chalk using discrete fracture network models

Daniel Kurtzman, Ronit Nativ, Eilon M. Adar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Multi-borehole pumping and tracer tests on the 10 to 100-m scale were conducted in a fractured chalk aquitard in the Negev Desert, Israel. Outcrop and core fracture surveys, as well as slug tests in packed-off intervals, were carried out at this site to obtain the parameters needed for construction of a stochastic discrete fracture network (DFN). Calibration of stochastic DFNs directly to the multiple borehole test data was inadequate. Instead, two equivalent deterministic DFN flow models were used: the vertical-fractures (VF) model, consisting of only vertical fractures, and the fractures' intersections (INT) model, consisting of vertical and horizontal fractures with enhanced transmissivity at their intersections. Both models were calibrated against the multi-borehole response of one pumping test and their predictions were tested against three other independent pumping tests. The average accuracies of all transient drawdown predictions of the VF and INT models were 65 and 66%, respectively. In contrast to this equality in average drawdown predictions of both models, the INT model predicted better important breakthrough curve features (e.g., first and peak arrival times), than the VF model. This result is in line with previously assumed channeled flow, derived from analytical analysis of these pumping and tracer tests.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1629-1642
Number of pages14
JournalHydrogeology Journal
Volume15
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2007

Keywords

  • Discrete fracture network (DFN)
  • Fractured rocks
  • Israel
  • Numerical modeling
  • Solute transport

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Water Science and Technology
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)

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