From will to live to will to die: oncologists, nurses, and social workers identification of suicidality in cancer patients

Leeat Granek, Ora Nakash, Samuel Ariad, Wendy Chen, Shira Birenstock-Cohen, Shahar Shapira, Merav Ben-David

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this research was to examine how oncologists, nurses, and social workers identify suicidality in cancer patients. Methods: Sixty-one healthcare professionals (23 oncologists, 18 social workers, and 20 nurses) at two academic cancer centers were interviewed using an in-depth interview guide. This was a qualitative study based on grounded theory methodology. Analysis involved line-by-line coding, with categories and themes emerging from participants’ narratives. Results: Suicidality in cancer patients exists on a wide spectrum that ranges from an active will to live to an active will to die. Four phases were identified that included: (A) a strong will to live expressed in themes of active treatments, seeking second opinions, overtreatment, and alternative treatments; (B) a decreasing will to live indicated in themes of mental health distress and physical pain and suffering; (C) a readiness to die expressed in themes of mental health distress, previous mental health diagnoses, physical pain, avoiding more suffering, preserving quality of life in old age, nearing end of life, lack of social support, and maintaining a sense of control; and (D) a will to die indicated in themes of euthanasia and active suicidality. Conclusions: Suicidality in cancer patients exists on a continuum. Cancer patients fluctuate on this spectrum depending on circumstances such as degree of suffering, their personalities and life circumstances, and whether they are nearing the end of life. Results of the study emphasize the need to collect more context specific data on suicidality among cancer patients and the importance of early integration of psychosocial and palliative care in the cancer treatment trajectory.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3691-3702
Number of pages12
JournalSupportive Care in Cancer
Volume25
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2017

Keywords

  • Assessment
  • Cancer
  • Oncology
  • Suicidality

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