Functional connectivity of the human face network exhibits right hemispheric lateralization from infancy to adulthood

Keren Lesinger, Gideon Rosenthal, Karen Pierce, Eric Courchesne, Ilan Dinstein, Galia Avidan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Adults typically exhibit right hemispheric dominance in the processing of faces. In this cross-sectional study, we investigated age-dependent changes in face processing lateralization from infancy to adulthood (1–48 years old; N = 194). We co-registered anatomical and resting state functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) scans of toddlers, children, adolescents, and adults into a common space and examined functional connectivity across the face, as well as place, and object-selective regions identified in adults. As expected, functional connectivity between core face-selective regions was stronger in the right compared to the left hemisphere in adults. Most importantly, the same lateralization was evident in all other age groups (infants, children, adolescents) and appeared only in face-selective regions, and not in place or object-selective regions. These findings suggest that the physiological development of face-selective brain areas may differ from that of object and place-selective areas. Specifically, the functional connectivity of the core-face selective regions exhibits rightward lateralization from infancy, years before these areas develop mature face-selective responses.

Original languageEnglish
Article number20831
JournalScientific Reports
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2023

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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