Gastrointestinal helminths from the common warthog, Phacochoerus africanus (Gmelin) (Suidae), in KwaZulu-Natal Province, South Africa, with comments on helminths of Suidae and Tayassuidae worldwide

Kerstin Junker, Andrea Spickett, Monlee Swanepoel, Boris R. Krasnov, Joop Boomker, Louwrens C. Hoffman

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1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Thirty warthogs, Phacochoerus africanus, were collected in the Pongola Game Reserve, South Africa and examined for helminths. Gastrointestinal helminth assemblages comprised Gastrodiscus aegyptiacus, the cestode genus Moniezia and seven species of nematodes. A single warthog harboured a metacestode of Taenia hydatigena in the mesenteries. No helminths were found in the heart, lungs or liver of the warthogs. Probstmayria vivipara and Murshidia spp. were the most prevalent as well as abundant helminth species, followed by Physocephalus sexalatus. The incidence of Moniezia did not differ between hosts of different sex or age. Numbers of Murshidia spp. were not affected by host sex, but were higher in adults than in juveniles. Conversely, burdens of Trichostrongylus thomasi were not affected by host age, but were higher in males than in females. While not highly significant, helminth assemblages in male warthogs were more species rich than in females. Helminth communities in the three genera of wild sub-Saharan suids are largely unique, but Ph. africanus and Hylochoerus meinertzhageni share more worm species with each other than with Potamochoerus larvatus, possibly because the former two are more closely related. Overlap between helminth communities of African wild suids and those of other suids and Tayassuidae worldwide is limited.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1541-1549
Number of pages9
JournalParasitology
Volume146
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Oct 2019

Keywords

  • Geographic distribution
  • Suidae
  • Tayassuidae
  • helminth communities
  • host range
  • warthogs

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