Genetic control of lipopolysaccharide induced generation of serum colony stimulating factor and proliferation of splenic granulocyte/macrophage precursor cells

Ron N. Apte, Dov H. Pluznik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

26 Scopus citations

Abstract

Administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) to mice causes a rise in tissue and serum colony stimulating factor (CSF) levels and in bone marrow and splenic colony forming cells (CFC). Two inbred strains of mice differing in their response to LPS were used to study the genetic control of LPS induced granulopoietic responses: a high responder strain (C3H/eB) which reacts to LPS by an elevation in serum CSF and by an increase in splenic CFC levels, and a low responder strain (C3H/HeJ) which fails to show these responses. The ability to generate serum CSF after administration of LPS is controlled by a single autosomal dominant gene, while the splenic CFC response to LPS follows the characteristic patterns of a polygenic inheritance control. The associated relationships of CSF and CFC responsiveness have been investigated in backcross (F1 x C3H/HeJ) and F2 mice. Most mice which generated high levels of CSF showed a high or intermediate CFC response and most mice which did not generate any detectable levels of serum CSF showed a low splenic CFC response. The results suggest that CSF may play a physiologic role in vivo as a granulopoietin. In addition it was shown that the genetic control mechanisms governing the CSF/CFC responses are determined by the lipid A‐KDO portion of the LPS molecule, suggesting that lipid A is the active part of the LPS molecule in stimulating granulopoiesis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)313-323
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Cellular Physiology
Volume89
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 1976
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology

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