Global Prevalence of Psychological Distress and Comorbidity With Disorders of Gut-Brain Interactions

Inês A. Trindade, Jóhann P. Hreinsson, Chloé Melchior, Joost P. Algera, Esther Colomier, Hans Törnblom, Douglas Drossman, Jan Tack, Olafur S. Palsson, Shrikant I. Bangdiwala, Ami D. Sperber, Magnus Simrén

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    2 Scopus citations

    Abstract

    INTRODUCTION: This study focused on defining the global prevalence of clinically relevant levels of psychological distress and somatic symptoms and the prevalence of coexistence between these symptoms and disorders of gut-brain interaction (DGBI). We also analyzed how clinically relevant psychological distress and somatic symptoms and coexistent DGBI are associated with health-related outcomes. METHODS: We included a representative sample of 54,127 adult participants (49.1% women; mean age of 44.3 years) from 26 countries worldwide. Participants completed an Internet survey (the Rome Foundation Global Epidemiology Study) with validated self-report questionnaires. RESULTS: Clinically relevant psychological distress and/or somatic symptom severity was reported by 37.5% of the sample. These participants had 4.45 times higher odds to have at least one DGBI than individuals without psychological distress and/or somatic symptoms. Compared with participants with psychological distress and/or somatic symptoms with vs without DGBI, participants with a DGBI reported increased healthcare and medication utilization (with OR from 1.6 to 2.8). Coexistent DGBI in participants with psychological distress and/or somatic symptoms was the variable most strongly associated with reduced mental (b 5 20.77; confidence interval [20.86 to 20.68]) and physical (b 5 21.17; confidence interval [21.24 to 21.10]) quality of life. DISCUSSION: This global study shows that psychological distress, somatic symptoms, and DGBI are very common and frequently overlap. The coexistence between psychological distress/somatic symptoms and DGBI seems to be especially detrimental to quality of life and healthcare utilization. Individuals with psychological distress/somatic symptoms and DGBI coexistence seem to be a group vulnerable to psychosocial problems that should be studied further and would likely benefit from psychological/ psychiatric interventions.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)165-175
    Number of pages11
    JournalAmerican Journal of Gastroenterology
    Volume119
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 1 Jan 2024

    Keywords

    • DGBI
    • epidemiology
    • psychological distress
    • somatic symptoms

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Gastroenterology
    • Hepatology

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