Hormonal responses to nasal application of synthetic gonadotropin-releasing hormone in amenorrheic patients pretreated with gonadotropins

G. Potashnik, R. Homburg, A. Eshkol, V. Insler, B. Lunenfeld

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Synthetic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in the form of nasal drops was self-administered by five amenorrheic patients in an attempt to assess its therapeutic value in anovulatory infertility. After follicular maturation had been induced with human menopausal gonadotropins (HMG), a total daily dose of 7.5 mg of GnRH in the form of nasal drops was self-administered at 2-hour intervals for 6 hours on 3 consecutive days. In four patients, plasma luteinizing hormone (LH) levels were significantly elevated over a period of at least 8 hours. In three of these patients, in addition, there was a definite upward shift in the basal body temperature (BBT) curve, and uterine bleeding occurred 6 to 9 days after the first dose of GnRH. In the fourth patient, ovulation was induced as indicated by a biphasic BBT curve, a plasma progesterone level of 13 ng/ml, and a luteal phase of 15 days. In the remaining patient, there was a borderline LH response and no clinical response. It is concluded that GnRH, in the form of nasal drops, is effective in eliciting and maintaining elevated plasma LH levels in patients in whom follicular maturation has been induced with HMG. By obtaining ovulatory L-H levels, such a regimen can lead to ovulation. In addition, intranasal self-administration of GnRH is convenient and may provide an alternative route of administration for long-term therapy with this hormone.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)234-238
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Journal of Fertility
Volume25
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1 Dec 1980
Externally publishedYes

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