Human factors in cued target acquisition

Masha Maltz, David Shinar

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

Abstract

Target acquisition in military and industrial settings is often augmented by a cueing system, whereby a computer gives advice that can be accepted or rejected by the human observer. Two human actors issues involved with the use of such cuers are: 1) how to present the cue to the observer, and 2) to what degree will the observer use or rely upon the provided information, particularly in cases where the cuer is not wholly reliable. In this paper, we consider both of these issues. Infrared military-type images that were overlaid with cues to suggest target presence were presented to six groups of observers. The observers were informed that the cues were not always correct. We presented several different cue interfaces to our observers. When questioned, the observers indicated a preference for particular cue types. Overall, the observers' opinions about the cue types were reflected in their acquisition results. Observer performance was higher when cued than when not cued. Although the cues were effective, different cue reliability levels did not influence the results to a large degree.

Original languageEnglish
Pages488-491
Number of pages4
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2000
EventProceedings of the XIVth Triennial Congress of the International Ergonomics Association and 44th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Association, 'Ergonomics for the New Millennnium' - San Diego, CA, United States
Duration: 29 Jul 20004 Aug 2000

Conference

ConferenceProceedings of the XIVth Triennial Congress of the International Ergonomics Association and 44th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Association, 'Ergonomics for the New Millennnium'
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CitySan Diego, CA
Period29/07/004/08/00

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

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