Inscriptions and incised potsherds from the western wall plaza excavations, Jerusalem

Daniel Vainstub

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Excavations conducted approximately 100 m west of the Western Wall in 2005-2009 by Shlomit Weksler-Bdolah and Alexander Onn revealed an impressive building, probably a four-room house, that was constructed in the seventh century BCE (Plan 1; see Keel, this volume; Ornan, this volume; Ornan et al., this volume). The article first discusses inscriptions incised on three pottery fragments (Items 1-3; Table 1:1-3; Figs. 1-3) that were found in the fills beneath the floors of the building. It then singles out incised marks on 23 additional potsherds (Items 4-26; Table 1: 4-26; Figs. 4-8) from among many that were found in the fills beneath the floors and in the debris that was deposited in and around the building after its destruction in the first quarter of the sixth century BCE (586 BCE?). The debris, originating higher up on the western slope, yielded an assemblage containing only late Iron Age finds (eighth-sixth centuries BCE). The inscriptions and the markings were incised with a stylus.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAtiqot
Pages1-12+87-88
Edition1
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2012

Publication series

NameAtiqot
Number1
Volume72
ISSN (Print)0792-8424

Keywords

  • Epigraphy
  • Iron Age
  • Jerusalem
  • Judah
  • Paleography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Conservation
  • Archaeology
  • Archaeology

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