Interest Rate Demands and Television Viewing—Is a Single Exposure More Influential Than Routine Viewing?

Amir Hetsroni, Abira Reizer, Uri Ben Zion

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined the impact of media consumption, and particularly exposure to television, on decisions regarding interest rate demands. One hundred and fifty-four participants were randomly divided into two groups: in the manipulation group, participants were exposed to a news clip about an Iranian nuclear attack on Israel, whereas in the control group, the participants were not exposed to the film. Both groups filled a questionnaires regarding their interest rate requirements in different situations, their media conception behaviors, and demographic questionnaires. Frequent routine viewing increased the interest rate demands only among participants in the manipulation group, but the manipulation itself did not have a significant effect on interest rate demands. The results are explained in terms of cultivation theory.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)332-360
Number of pages29
JournalPsychological Reports
Volume120
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Apr 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cultivation
  • discounting
  • experiment
  • interest rate
  • loans
  • money
  • television

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