Intermittent treatment with droperidol, a short-acting neuroleptic, increases behavioral dopamine receptor sensitivity.

R. H. Belmaker, A. Elami, J. Bannet

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    8 Scopus citations

    Abstract

    Drug holidays have been proposed as a preventive strategy against the development of tardive dyskinesia. Three animal studies in which dopamine receptor hypersensitivity after chronic neuroleptic treatment was used as a model for tardive dyskinesia failed to find any reduction in dopamine receptor hypersensitivity with intermittent, as opposed to continuous, treatment. Since most neuroleptics have a long half-life in vivo, we hypothesized that truly drug-free periods may not have been achieved in previous studies. Droperidol, an ultrashort-acting butyrophenone neuroleptic, was administered to rats for 22 days in twice-daily injections or one injection every 48 hours. At 60 hours after the last dose there was no difference in apomorphine-induced stereotypy between continuously treated and intermittently treated animals. Thus, even totally drug-free periods do not reduce the development of dopamine receptor hypersensitivity.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)194-199
    Number of pages6
    JournalPsychopharmacology. Supplementum
    Volume2
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 1 Jan 1985

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • General Medicine

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