Intolerance to uncertainty and self-efficacy as mediators between personality traits and adjustment disorder in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic

Miri Kestler-Peleg, Michal Mahat-Shamir, Shani Pitcho-Prelorentzos, Maya Kagan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

In April 2020, early in the COVID-19 outbreak, governments restricted public gatherings and ordered social distancing. These demands led to challenging adaptations, which in some cases resulted in mental health issues, including adjustment disorder. Guided by the transactional stress model, the current study aimed to examine the relations between personality traits and adjustment disorder in crisis situations and vagueness and the role of intolerance to uncertainty and self-efficacy in these relations. During Israel’s first lockdown, 673 Israeli adults completed self-reported e-version questionnaires regarding Big Five personality traits, adjustment disorder, intolerance to uncertainty, self-efficacy, and background variables. The study was designed to examine the association between personality traits and adjustment disorder and the potential mediation of intolerance to uncertainty and self-efficacy in associations. The findings revealed that intolerance to uncertainty and self-efficacy mediated the association between personality traits and adjustment disorder. The results are consistent with the transactional stress model. They shed light on the role of intolerance to uncertainty and self-efficacy as cognitive mechanisms that promote the development of adjustment disorder. Recommendations for future studies and practice are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)8504-8514
Number of pages11
JournalCurrent Psychology
Volume42
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Apr 2023

Keywords

  • Coronavirus-19
  • Lockdown
  • Social cognitive theory
  • Transactional stress model

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Psychology

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