Is somebody watching you? Ancient surveillance systems in the southern Judean desert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

The Panoptic model of surveillance, which enables a small number of observers to control large numbers of people, is usually considered a modern (18th century AD) invention and a conceptual corner-stone of modern surveillance and disciplinary systems. On the basis of two case studies encountered in a survey near the southwestern edge of the Dead Sea, this study suggests that the concept of surveillance is much older. The first case deals with a quarry from the Roman period, and the second concentrates on an ascent from the Early Bronze Age II-III periods (3000-2400 BC).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)65-89
Number of pages25
JournalJournal of Mediterranean Archaeology
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jun 2006

Keywords

  • Bronze Age
  • Israel
  • Landscape archaeology
  • Negev
  • Panoptic surveillance
  • Roman

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Archaeology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

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