Is xanthine dehydrogenase involved in response of pea plants (Pisum sativum L.) to salinity or ammonium treatment?

Edyta Zdunek-Zastocka, Herman S. Lips

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8 Scopus citations

Abstract

The effect of salinity and different nitrogen sources on the level of xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) activity in roots and leaves of pea plants was investigated. Two bands of xanthine dehydrogenase activity (XDH-R2, XDH-R3) were detected in roots after native PAGE and staining with hypoxanthine as substrate. Only one band of XDH activity (XDH-L1) was detected in leaf extracts. Within leaves of three different ages the highest XDH activity was detected in young leaves both under control as well as stress conditions. Salinity did not affect significantly the activity of XDH in pea roots, however, depressed XDH activity in leaves. A significant increase of XDH activity both in roots and leaves was observed only when ammonium was applied as the sole N source. Increased concentration of ureides in the xylem sap of pea plants was observed for both ammonium and high salt treatments, although the higher content of ureides in the xylem sap of 100 mM NaCl treated plants may be rather a result of lower rate of exudation from roots than of increased root ureide biosynthesis. Thus, the changes of root and leaf XDH activity in pea plants seem to be tightly correlated with ureide synthesis that is induced by NH 4+, the product of N fixation, and rather than by salinity. A contribution of pea XDH in increased oxygen species or uric acid production under saline conditions seems to be less than likely.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)395-401
Number of pages7
JournalActa Physiologiae Plantarum
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2003

Keywords

  • Ammonium
  • Pisum sativum L
  • Plant stress response
  • Salinity
  • Ureides
  • XDH
  • Xanthine dehydrogenase

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