Jewish immigrants to Israel: Self-Reported Powerlessness and Alienation among Immigrants from the Soviet Union and North America

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Abstract

Using Rotter 's original locus of control scale on immigrants to Israel from the Soviet Union and North America, the Soviet immigrants scored significantly higher (more external) than North American immigrants on items with political and societal connotations. Differences between immigrants were minimal on items which lack political and societal connotations. Personal ideology tends to be shared by individuals in highly industrialized societies, while control ideology tends to be conditioned by factors related to the societal climate and political regime. It was also shown that Rotter 's scale is multidimensional and is influenced not only by personality factors and patterns of socialization but also by variables related to the social system.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)366-374
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Cross-Cultural Psychology
Volume10
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 1979
Externally publishedYes

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