Lightweight housing in the arid periphery: Implications for thermal comfort and energy use

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

Abstract

Throughout the arid lands in which man has settled, traditional solutions to housing have most often relied on readily accessible building materials, and on techniques which were adapted both to the characteristics of these materials and to the constraints of local climate and geography. Such vernacular housing is exemplified by the cliff dwellings and adobe pueblos of the American Southwest, as well as by the vaulted stone dwellings built by Nabateans and Byzantines in the Negev. In these examples, it may be noted that the construction techniques developed by local inhabitants employed locally available heavy materials with a high thermal inertia, capable of moderating the sharp fluctuations of heat and cold which characterize the desert climate.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Arid Frontier
Subtitle of host publicationInteractive Management of Environment and Development
EditorsH.J. Bruins, H. Lithwick
PublisherKluwer Academic Publishers
Chapter19
Pages365-381
Number of pages17
Volume41
ISBN (Electronic)978-94-011-4888-7
ISBN (Print)978-94-010-6049-3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 1998

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Lightweight housing in the arid periphery: Implications for thermal comfort and energy use'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this