Lipidomic and transcriptomic analysis reveals reallocation of carbon flux from cuticular wax into plastid membrane lipids in a glossy “Newhall” navel orange mutant

Haoliang Wan, Hongbo Liu, Jingyu Zhang, Yi Lyu, Zhuoran Li, Yizhong He, Xiaoliang Zhang, Xiuxin Deng, Yariv Brotman, Alisdair R. Fernie, Yunjiang Cheng, Weiwei Wen

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6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Both cuticle and membrane lipids play essential roles in quality maintenance and disease resistance in fresh fruits. Many reports have indicated the modification of alternative branch pathways in epicuticular wax mutants; however, the specific alterations concerning lipids have not been clarified thus far. Here, we conducted a comprehensive, time-resolved lipidomic, and transcriptomic analysis on the “Newhall” navel orange (WT) and its glossy mutant (MT) “Gannan No. 1”. The results revealed severely suppressed wax formation accompanied by significantly elevated production of 36-carbon plastid lipids with increasing fruit maturation in MT. Transcriptomics analysis further identified a series of key functional enzymes and transcription factors putatively involved in the biosynthesis pathways of wax and membrane lipids. Moreover, the high accumulation of jasmonic acid (JA) in MT was possibly due to the need to maintain plastid lipid homeostasis, as the expression levels of two significantly upregulated lipases (CsDAD1 and CsDALL2) were positively correlated with plastid lipids and characterized to hydrolyze plastid lipids to increase the JA content. Our results will provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the natural variation of plant lipids to lay a foundation for the quality improvement of citrus fruit.

Original languageEnglish
Article number41
JournalHorticulture Research
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2020

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