Losing and regaining reflective functioning in the times of COVID-19: Clinical risks and opportunities from a mentalizing approach

Dana Lassri, Alex Desatni

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Much has been said about the severe mental health consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic-a collective trauma, defined as an epidemiological and psychological crisis (American Psychological Association, 2020)-both in the present and in the foreseeable future. A large body of evidence suggests that mentalizing is a beneficial transtheoretical and transdiagnostic concept not only for understanding vulnerability to psychopathology but also in its treatment (for review, see Luyten, Campbell, Allison, & Fonagy, 2020). The current commentary therefore seeks to consider the COVID-19 pandemic-related risks for psychopathology but also discuss the clinical opportunities of the situation by incorporating a perspective of mentalization theory and practice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)S38-S40
JournalPsychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy
Volume12
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • COVID-19
  • Mentalizing
  • Psychopathology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

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