Love and Miracles: Body, Feminine Self-Image and Family in Narratives by Two Holocaust Survivors from Salonika

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article presents an in-depth literary analysis of two feminine personal narratives, survivors of the Salonika Holocaust, in an attempt to isolate the unique feminine voice that can be discerned from the narratives through the perception of the body and the female self-image. The two narratives offer two opposite models of behavior: one active, one passive. Aliza Baruch found her future husband in the camp and took care of her brother. Later she gave birth to two children even though she suffered sterilization experiments in Auschwitz. Aliza ascribes her survival to her determined nature, and to the force of love she felt within herself. Mary Nahman, who arrived at Auschwitz married and pregnant, perceived herself as a child who was not conscious of her surroundings but was a recipient of help from everybody. She ascribes her survival to external forces, divine assistance and miracles.
Original languageEnglish GB
Pages (from-to)69-84
JournalEuropean Journal of Jewish Studies
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

Keywords

  • Holocaust women survivors
  • personal narratives
  • Salonika
  • feminine voice
  • self-image
  • ethnic group identity
  • Sephardic culture

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Love and Miracles: Body, Feminine Self-Image and Family in Narratives by Two Holocaust Survivors from Salonika'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this