Low-frequency electromagnetic fields induce a stress effect upon higher plants, as evident by the universal stress signal, alanine

Edna Ben-Izhak Monselise, Abraham H. Parola, Daniel Kost

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

54 Scopus citations

Abstract

15N NMR analysis reveals alanine production in Duckweed plants exposed to low intensity sinusoidally varying magnetic fields (SVMF) at 60 and 100Hz, and fed by 15N-labeled ammonium chloride. Alanine does not accumulate in the absence of SVMF. Addition of vitamin C, a radical scavenger, reduced alanine production by 82%, indicating the roll of free radicals in the process. Alanine accumulation in plants and animals in response to exposure to a variety of stress conditions, including SVMF, is a general phenomenon. It is proposed that alanine is a universal first stress signal expressed by cells.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)427-434
Number of pages8
JournalBiochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
Volume302
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 10 Jan 2003

Keywords

  • Abiotic stress
  • Alanine accumulation under stress
  • Etiolated plants
  • Free radicals
  • N NMR analysis
  • Nitrogen assimilation
  • Spirodela oligorrhiza (Lemnaceae) (Duckweed)
  • Universal stress signal
  • Vitamin C
  • Weak sinusoidally varying magnetic fields

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

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