Macroeconomic adjustment and the history of crises in open economies

Joshua Aizenman, Ilan Noy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper investigates the impact of the history of crises on macroeconomic performance. We first study the impact of past banking crises on the probability of a future banking crisis. We do not detect a learning process from past banking crises. Countries that have already experienced one banking crisis generally have a higher likelihood of experiencing another crisis; and the depth of the crisis does not appear to be affected by the previous historical experience with crisis events. Evidence also suggests that, in middle-income countries, higher de jure capital account openness is associated with lower likelihood of a banking crisis, a lower ratio of non-performing loans during the crisis, and higher levels of forgone output in the crisis' aftermath. In contrast, we find that past crisis experience has a significant impact on savings. When facing considerable political risk, the past does seem to matter - countries with more people who were exposed, over their lifetime, to larger disasters will tend to save more. This association, however, does not hold for countries with more stable political systems.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)41-58
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of International Money and Finance
Volume38
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Nov 2013
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Banking crises
  • Financial openness
  • History of crises
  • Saving

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