Making Responsible Life Plans: Cultural Differences in Lay Attitudes in Germany and Israel Towards Predictive Genetic Testing for Late-Onset Diseases

Aviad E. Raz, Silke Schicktanz

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

Abstract

This chapter extends the analysis of medico-legal policies and expert bioethical discourses by adding the dimension of lay moralities, examining the attitudes and arguments of lay people and assessing differences and similarities based on cultural grammars as well as personal experience. Focus groups with lay people (both affected and not affected) were conducted in Germany and Israel in order to study the effect of culture (Germany/Israel) as well as religiosity and the personal experience of susceptibility (being affected or not) on lay perceptions of responsibility for “making life plans” in the context of predictive genetic testing. We also examine how perceptions of risk are articulated within broader cultural scripts of individualism/collectivism, self-determination/relational ethics, and universalistic/particularistic lessons of the Holocaust.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSpringerBriefs in Ethics
PublisherSpringer Nature
Pages55-66
Number of pages12
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2016

Publication series

NameSpringerBriefs in Ethics
ISSN (Print)2211-8101
ISSN (Electronic)2211-811X

Keywords

  • Colon Cancer
  • Genetic Testing
  • Large Support
  • Predictive Genetic Testing
  • Predictive Testing

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