Manual Pressure Points Technique for Massive Hemorrhage Control—A Prospective Human Volunteer Study

Regina Pikman Gavriely, Yotam Lior, Shaul Gelikas, Shiran Levy, Alon Ahimor, Elon Glassberg, Shachar Shapira, Avi Benov, Guy Avital

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: While commonly thought to be effective for management of limb and junctional hemorrhage, the manual pressure points technique was excluded from leading prehospital guidelines over a decade ago following the publication of a single human-volunteers study presenting unfavorable results. This work aimed to re-assess the efficacy and feasibility of the femoral and supraclavicular pressure points technique for temporary hemorrhage control distal to the pressure point. Methods: A prospective, non-randomized, human volunteer, controlled environment study. In the study 35 healthy male combat medics (age 21.1 ± 1.3 years) received brief training after which they were requested to apply pressure in the femoral and supraclavicular points in attempts to stop regional blood flow, measured distally by Doppler ultrasound. Success rates in achieving flow cessation in under 2 minutes, time required for achievement of flow cessation, and cumulative flow cessation duration within a 3-minute follow-up after initial success were measured. Results: For the supraclavicular point, success rates were 97.1% with a mean time to success of 12.5 (±20.9) seconds, lasting for 76.2% (±23.7) of the follow-up time. For the femoral point, success rates were 100% with a mean time to success of 5.5 (±4.3) seconds, lasting for 98.7% (±3.8) of the follow-up time. Conclusions: Manual pressure on the femoral and supraclavicular points is an applicable and efficient method for temporary hemorrhage control distal to the pressure point. As such, with additional study, this method may be considered for re-introduction to prehospital care guidelines and training programs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)586-591
Number of pages6
JournalPrehospital Emergency Care
Volume27
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2023
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency
  • Emergency Medicine

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