Maternal anthropometry and infant feeding practices in Israel in relation to growth in infancy: The North African Infant Feeding Study

Wafaie W. Fawzi, Michele R. Forman, Amalia Levy, Barry I. Graubard, Lechaim Naggan, Heinz W. Berendes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Relations between maternal anthropometric status during pregnancy and infant feeding practices and growth from birth through the first 6 mo of life were examined in a cohort of 351 Israeli mother-infant pairs of North African descent. Maternal weight, height, and triceps skinfold thicknesses were determined at 6 and 9 mo of pregnancy, while infants' weights and lengths were measured at birth and at 1, 2, 3, and 6 mo of age with concurrent collection of age-specific maternal-reported infant feeding data. On the basis of multiple-linear-regression analysis that adjusted for potential covariates, mean maternal weight at the first prenatal visit and at 6 and 9 mo of pregnancy were positively associated with birth length (P for trend in all cases < 0.0001) and with linear growth between birth and 1, 3, and 6 mo of age. Maternal skinfold thickness at 9 moot pregnancy and maternal height were also significantly associated with birth length. Moreover, maternal height, weight, and skinfold thickness at 6 and 9 mo of pregnancy were positively associated with mean birth weight. After adjustment for morbidity in the past month and other covariates, infants breast-fed exclusively had greater attained weight and weight gain in the first 3 mo compared with infants who were bottle-fed exclusively, breast-fed and bottle-fed, or solid- fed exclusively. These findings underscore the need for programs that improve the nutritional status of women before, during, and after pregnancy, and encourage exclusive breast-feeding of infants for at least the first 3 mo of life.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1731-1737
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume65
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 1997

Keywords

  • Anthropometry
  • Bottle- feeding
  • Breast feeding
  • Growth
  • Height
  • Humans
  • Infants
  • Length
  • Pregnancy
  • Skinfold thickness
  • Weight

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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