Maternal Hepatitis B or Hepatitis C Virus Carrier Status is Not a Risk Factor for Long-Term Oncologic Morbidity of the Offspring: A Population-Based Cohort Study

Naim Abu-Freha, Tamar Wainstock, Liat Poupko, Eyal Sheiner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We investigated whether maternal hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) carrier status increases the risk for long-term oncologic morbidity of their offspring up to the age of 18 years. A population-based cohort study was conducted, including all singleton deliveries between the years 1991 and 2014 at a tertiary medical center. Our study included: HBV carriers (n = 588), HCV carriers (n = 183) and non-carriers (n = 241,570. No significant differences regarding oncologic morbidity were found between offspring of HBV carriers (0.2%), HCV carriers (0%) and non-carriers (0.6%; p = 0.216, respectively). To conclude: maternal HBV or HCV carrier status is not a risk factor for long-term oncologic morbidity of the offspring.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)690-695
Number of pages6
JournalCancer Investigation
Volume39
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2021

Keywords

  • Hepatitis B
  • hepatitis C
  • long-term
  • offspring
  • oncologic morbidity

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Maternal Hepatitis B or Hepatitis C Virus Carrier Status is Not a Risk Factor for Long-Term Oncologic Morbidity of the Offspring: A Population-Based Cohort Study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this