Metamorphic grade and gradient from white K-micas of Na-mica bearing sedimentary rocks in the Mosquito Creek Basin, East Pilbara Craton, Western Australia

Hanan J. Kisch, Wouter Nijman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Shales and phyllites from the turbidite sequences of the 2.9 Ga Mosquito Creek Formation of the East Pilbara, Western Australia contain varying amounts of paragonite and mixed Na-K micas (MNKMs), the 0 0 l X-ray diffraction reflections of which are unresolved from the 10-Å reflections, and only partly resolved from the 5-Å reflections of white K-mica (WKM). The Kübler index ('crystallinity'), the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the WKM, obtained from these composite reflections by applying a three-peak deconvolution procedure, reveals a metamorphic zoning of the Mosquito Creek Formation. The highest, "epimetamorphic", grade occurs in the - largely Na-mica free - southern part, with lower, medium- to high-anchimetamorphic, grades in the central part, notably in a WSW-ENE anticlinal zone extending from Nullagine to the Blue Spec Mine. The Na-mica free metasediments of the Glen Herring Shale of the Fortescue Group, overlying the Mosquito Creek Formation to the W, show only a slightly lower metamorphic grade. The low b0 lattice parameter of the WKMs indicates a very low metamorphic P/T gradient. The Na-mica bearing metasediments of the Mosquito Creek Formation correspond to a kaolinite-bearing protolith, strongly Al-enriched and K-depleted with respect to the presumably granitic-tonalitic source rock.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)11-26
Number of pages16
JournalPrecambrian Research
Volume176
Issue number1-4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2010

Keywords

  • Deconvolution
  • Illite 'crystallinity'
  • Kübler index
  • Metamorphic grade
  • Metamorphic gradient
  • Mosquito Creek Formation
  • Na-mica
  • Pilbara
  • X-ray diffraction

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