Metapopulation ecology links antibiotic resistance, consumption, and patient transfers in a network of hospital wards

Julie Teresa Shapiro, Gilles Leboucher, Anne Florence Myard-Dury, Pascale Girardo, Anatole Luzatti, Mélissa Mary, Jean François Sauzon, Bénédicte Lafay, Olivier Dauwalder, Frédéric Laurent, Gérard Lina, Christian Chidiac, Sandrine Couray-Targe, François Vandenesch, Jean Pierre Flandrois, Jean Philippe Rasigade

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a global threat. A better understanding of how antibiotic use and between-ward patient transfers (or connectivity) impact population-level AMR in hospital networks can help optimize antibiotic stewardship and infection control strategies. Here, we used a metapopulation framework to explain variations in the incidence of infections caused by 7 major bacterial species and their drug-resistant variants in a network of 357 hospital wards. We found that ward-level antibiotic consumption volume had a stronger influence on the incidence of the more resistant pathogens, while connectivity had the most influence on hospital-endemic species and carbapenem-resistant pathogens. Piperacillin-tazobactam consumption was the strongest predictor of the cumulative incidence of infections resistant to empirical sepsis therapy. Our data provide evidence that both antibiotic use and connectivity measurably influence hospital AMR. Finally, we provide a ranking of key antibiotics by their estimated population-level impact on AMR that might help inform antimicrobial stewardship strategies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-42
Number of pages42
JournaleLife
Volume9
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Oct 2020
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience (all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology (all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology (all)

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