Moral justification and feelings of adjustment to military law-enforcement situation: The case of Israeli soldiers serving at army roadblocks

Shaul Kimhi, Shifra Sagy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

The research examined the use of moral justification as a mediating mechanism of stress, used by compulsory Israeli soldiers who had served at army roadblocks in the West Bank. Employing Bandura's model of moral disengagement, we expected that the greater the justification of army roadblocks by the soldier, the more he would feel adjusted to army demands. Feelings of adjustment to this situation were examined using three components: cognitive, affective and behavioral. The sample was composed of 170 Israeli ex-soldiers who had served for at least 1 month at army roadblocks in the West Bank during the Al-Aksa Intifada. The results supported the hypothesis regarding association between moral justification and feelings of adjustment at the end of army service. The mediating hypothesis was partially supported. Significance of moral justification as a mechanism of coping with the enforced situation of military law is discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)177-191
Number of pages15
JournalMind and Society
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Nov 2008

Keywords

  • Army roadblocks
  • Feelings of adjustment
  • Moral justification

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